Traces of history
Built just two years before Canada's Confederation and once the estate of Sir Sandford Fleming, Winterholme today offers sixteen exceptional apartments within the walls of a former manor house.

Heritage living
Residents of Winterholme enjoy original details such as oak paneling, fireplace mantels, deep window sills, and twelve foot ceilings. Large lawns, mature trees, and greenery evoke the estate's past.

Prime location
Originally on the periphery of the city, Sandy Hill is now one of Ottawa's most central districts. Just minutes away are Parliament, the downtown core, the Byward Market, and the University of Ottawa.


Singular layouts

Each of the seventeen apartments has a unique layout, affording Winterholme residents a lifestyle that is far from cookie cutter. Configurations include one bedroom and two bedroom apartments, a few of which are sampled above.

Once a grand family manor before being converted into apartments in 1925, spaces in Winterholme have extra high ceilings and deep heritage mouldings. Features such as claw foot tubs and fireplace mantels make one feel at home.


The edifice

Winterholme was once home to Sir Sandford Fleming, the famed inventor of uniform standard time zones. After the departure of the Flemings, Winterholme was converted to aparments in the 1920s with the entrance moved to the south side of the structure.

Designated in 1979 under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act, Winterholme is recognized by the City of Ottawa for the importance of its former inhabitants and for its marking of the early 20th Century trend in Sandy Hill of estates being altered for conversion into apartments.


The community

Winterholme is a short walk from Strathcona Park and also within walking distance of all that Ottawa's Byward Market has to offer, not to mention the many amenities along nearby Laurier and Rideau Streets.

Sandy Hill is one of Ottawa's oldest neighbourhoods and its treelined streets are perfect for pleasant strolls. It is a community of arts, parks, embassies, with families, students and seniors calling it home.



Address

309 & 311 Daly Avenue

Built

1865 (as 'Chapel Court')

Architect

H.H. Horsey

Client

George-Edouard Desbarats

Style

Italianate (modified)

Apartment conversion

1925

Floors

Three

Number of units

Seventeen

Parking

Exterior

Access

Walk-up (no elevator)

Heritage designation

Designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act (1979)

Further reading

   By Request: HERE'S HORSEY  (urbsite.blogspot.ca)


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